Language, Thought, and Reality

Selected Writings of Benjamin Lee Whorf
Overview

The pioneering linguist Benjamin Whorf (1897–1941) grasped the relationship between human language and human thinking: how language can shape our innermost thoughts. His basic thesis is that our perception of the world and our ways of thinking about it are deeply influenced by the structure of the languages we speak. The writings collected in this volume include important papers on the Maya, Hopi, and Shawnee languages as well as more general reflections on language and meaning.

Table of Contents

  1. Foreword

    Stuart Chase

  2. Introduction

    John B. Carrol

  3. 1. On the connection of ideas (1927)
  4. 2. On psychology (date unkown)
  5. 3. A central Mexican inscription combining Mexican and Maya day signs (1931)
  6. 4. The punctual and segmentative aspects of verbs in Hopi (1936)
  7. 5. An American Indian model of the universe (circa 1936)
  8. 6. A linguistic consideration of thinking in primitive communities (circa 1936)
  9. 7. Grammatical categories (1937)
  10. 8. Discussion of Hopi linguistics (1937)
  11. 9. Some verbal categories of Hopi (1938)
  12. 10. Language: plan and conception of arrangement (1938)
  13. 11. The relation of habitual thought and behavior to language (1939)
  14. 12. Gestalt technique of stem composition in Shawnee (1939)
  15. 13. Decipherment of the linguistic portion of the Maya hieroglyphs (1940)
  16. 14. Linguistic factors in the terminology of Hopi architecture (1940)
  17. 15. Science and linguistics (1940)
  18. 16. Linguistics as an exact science (1940)
  19. 17. Language and logic (1941)
  20. 18. Language, mind, and reality (1941)
  21. Bibliography