Looking into Pictures

An Interdisciplinary Approach to Pictorial Space
Overview

The last half of the twentieth century witnessed dramatic changes in the theory of vision. In particular, the "eye-as-camera" metaphor that had long dominated the field no longer seemed tenable. Somewhat surprisingly, however, the metaphor has maintained its appeal in the study of pictures. In Looking into Pictures, philosophers, psychologists, and art historians explore the implications of recent theories of vision for our understanding of the nature of pictorial representation and picture perception. They examine the dual nature of picture perception, the fact that viewers must separate the visual properties of the picture itself from those of what the picture represents. Discussing the status of perspective, they ask whether perspective renderings of space are special or more accurate than those found in other types of pictures, and if so why. Finally, they consider the possible need to reconceive pictorial space and the implications of such a reconception for the study of picture perception.

Table of Contents

  1. Acknowledgements
  2. Introduction
  3. I. THE DUAL NATURE OF PICTURE PERCEPTION
  4. 1. In Defense of Seeing-In

    Richard Wollheim

  5. 2. Conjoint Representations and the Mental Capacity for Multiple Simultaneous

    Rainer Mausfeld

  6. 3. Relating Direct and Indirect Perception of Spatial Layout

    H. A. Sedgwick

  7. 4. The Dual Nature of Picture Perception: A Challenge to Current General Accounts of Visual Perception

    Reinhard Niederée and Dieter Heyer

  8. 4. Perceptual Strategies and Pictorial Content

    Mark Rollins

  9. II. THE STATUS OF PERSPECTIVE
  10. 6. Optical Laws of Symbolic Rules? The Dual Nature of Pictorial Systems

    John Willats

  11. 7. Perspective, Convention, and Compromise

    Robert Hopkins

  12. 8. Reseblance Reconceived

    Klaus Sachs-Hombach

  13. 9. What you See Is What You Get: The Problems of Linear Perspective

    Klaus Rehkämper

  14. 10. Pictures of Perspective: Theory or Therapy?

    Patrick Maynard

  15. III. THE NATURE AND STRUCTURE OF RECONCEIVED PICTORIAL SPACE
  16. 11. Reconceiving Perceptual Space

    James E. Cutting

  17. 12. Pictorial Space

    Jan J. Koenderink and Andrea J. van Doorn

  18. 13. Thurth and Meaning in Pictorial Space

    Sheena Rogers

  19. 14. Line and Borders of Surfaces: Grouping and Foreshortening

    John M. Kennedy, Igor Juricevic, and Juan Bai

  20. 15. Irreconcilable Views

    Hermann Kalkofen

  21. References
  22. Contributors
  23. Index
  24. Color Insert