Harold Kincaid

Harold Kincaid is Professor in the School of Economics and Director of the Research Unit in Behavioural Economics and Neuroeconomics at the University of Cape Town. He is the coeditor of Distributed Cognition and the Will: Individual Volition and Social Context and What Is Addiction? (both published by the MIT Press).

Books by this Author

Jerome Wakefield and His Critics
By Harold Kincaid, Peter Zachar, Dominic Murphy, Justin Garson, Philip Gerrans, Rachel Cooper, Steeves Demazeux, Leen De Vreese, Maël Lemoine, Tim Thornton, Andreas De Block, Jonathan Sholl, Jerome Wakefield
The open access edition of this book was made possible by generous funding from Arcadia – a charitable fund of Lisbet Rausing and Peter Baldwin.One of the most pressing theoretical problems of psychiatry is the definition of mental disorder. Jerome Wakefield's proposal that mental disorder is “harmful dysfunction” has been both influential and widely debated; philosophers...

Books by this Editor

Individual Volition and Social Context
Edited By Don Ross, David Spurrett, Harold Kincaid, G. Lynn Stephens
Recent scientific findings about human decision making would seem to threaten the traditional concept of the individual conscious will. The will is threatened from “below” by the discovery that our apparently spontaneous actions are actually controlled and initiated from below the level of our conscious awareness, and from “above” by the recognition that we adapt our...
Edited By Don Ross, Harold Kincaid, David Spurrett, Peter Collins
The image of the addict in popular culture combines victimhood and moral failure; we sympathize with addicts in films and novels because of their suffering and their hard-won knowledge. And yet actual scientific knowledge about addiction tends to undermine this cultural construct. In What Is Addiction?, leading addiction researchers from neuroscience, psychology, genetics, philosophy, economics,...
Mental Kinds and Natural Kinds
Edited By Harold Kincaid, Jacqueline A. Sullivan
In this volume, leading philosophers of psychiatry examine psychiatric classification systems, including the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM), asking whether current systems are sufficient for effective diagnosis, treatment, and research. Doing so, they take up the question of whether mental disorders are natural kinds, grounded in something in the outside world....