ISBN: 9780262033213 | 950 pp. | May 2004

Table of Contents
  Introduction
I. PERCEPTUAL CONSEQUENCES OF MULTIPLE SENSORY SYSTEMS
  1. The Cross-Modal Consequences of the Exogenous Spatial Orienting of Attention
CHARLES SPENCE and JOHN McDONALD
  2. Modulations of Visual Perception by Sound
LADAN SHAMS, YUKIYASU KAMITANI and SHINSUKE SHIMOJO
  3. Cross-Modal Interactions Evidenced by the Ventriloquism Effect in Humans and Monkeys
TIMOTHY M. WOODS and GREGG H. RECANZONE
  4. Multisensory Integration of Dynamic Information
SALVADOR SOTO-FARACO and ALAN KINGSTONE
  5. Sweet and Sour Smells: Learned Synesthesia Between the Sensesof Taste and Smell
RICHARD J. STEVENSON and ROBERT A. BOAKES
  6. Cross-Modal Interactions in Speeded Classification
LAWRENCE E. MARKS
  7. Multisensory Texture Perception
SUSAN J. LEDERMAN and ROBERTA L. KLATZKY
  8. Cross-Modal Object Recognition
FIONA N. NEWELL
  9. Perceptual Effects of Cross-Modal Stimulation: Ventriloquism and the Freezing Phenomenon
JEAN VROOMEN and BEATRICE DE GELDER
II. IS SPEECH A SPECIAL CASE OF MULTISENSORY INTEGRATION?
  10. From Multisensory Integration to Talking Heads and Language Learning
DOMINIC W. MASSARO
  11. Spatial and Temporal Constraints on Audiovisual Speech Perception
KEVIN G. MUNHALL and ERIC VATIKIOTIS-BATESON
  12. Speech as a Supramodal or Amodal Phenomenon
CAROL A. FOWLER
  13. Audiovisual Speech Binding: Convergence or Association?
LYNNE E. BERNSTEIN, EDWARD T. AUER and JEAN K. MOORE
  14. Multisensory Animal Communication
SARAH R. PARTAN
III. THE NEURAL MECHANISMS UNDERLYING THE INTEGRATION OF CROSS-MODAL CUES
  15. Multisensory Integration in Single Neurons of the Midbrain
BARRY E. STEIN, WAN JIANG and TERRENCE R. STANFORD
  16. Analysis and Modeling of Multisensory Enhancement in the Deep Superior Colliculus
THOMAS J. ANASTASIO and PAUL E. PATTON
  17. The Resurrection of Multisensory Cortex in Primates: Connection Patterns That Integrate Modalities
JON H. KAAS and CHRISTINE E. COLLINS
  18. Multisensory Convergence in Early Cortical Processing
CHARLES E. SCHROEDER and JOHN J. FOXE
  19. Multisensory Neuronal Convergence of Taste, Somatosensory, Visual, Olfactory, and Auditory Inputs
EDMUND T. ROLLS
  20. Cross-Modal Memory in Primates: The Neural Basis of Learning About the Multisensory Properties of Objects and Events
AMANDA PARKER and ALEXANDER EASTON
  21. Corticocortical Connectivity of Cross-Modal Circuits
M. ALEX MEREDITH
  22. Multisensory-Evoked Potentials in Rat Cortex
DANIEL S. BARTH and BARBARA BRETT-GREEN
IV. MULTISENSORY MECHANISMS IN ORIENTATION
  23. Auditory-Visual Interactions Subserving Primate Gaze Orienting
A. J. VAN OPSTAL and D. P. MUNOZ
  24. Modeling the Time Course of Multisensory Interaction in Manual and Saccadic Responses
ADELE DIEDERICH and HANS COLONIUS
  25. Multisensory Influences on Orientation and Movement Control
JAMES R. LACKNER and PAUL DIZIO
  26. Action as a Binding Key to Multisensory Integration
LEONARDO FOGASSI and VITTORIO GALLESE
  27. Multisensory Neurons for the Control of Defensive Movements
MICHAEL S. A. GRAZIANO, CHARLES G. GROSS, CHARLOTTE S. R. TAYLOR and TIRIN MOORE
  28. Cortical Mechanisms of Tool Use Subserved by Multisensory Integration
HIDETOSHI ISHIBASHI, SHIGERU OBAYASHI and ATSUSHI IRIKI
  29. Multisensory Representations of Space in the Posterior Parietal Cortex
YALE E. COHEN and RICHARD A. ANDERSEN
V. HUMAN BRAIN STUDIES OF MULTISENSORY PROCESSES
  30. Hemodynamic Studies of Audiovisual Interactions
GEMMA A. CALVERT and JAMES W. LEWIS
  31. Multiple Electrophysiological Mechanisms of Audiovisual Integration in Human Perception
ALEXANDRA FORT and MARIE-HÉLÈNE GIARD
  32. MEG Studies of Cross-Modal Integration and Plasticity
TOMMI RAIJ and VEIKKO JOUSMÄKI
  33. Functional Imaging Evidence for Multisensory Spatial Representations and Cross-Modal Attentional Interactions in the Human Brain
EMILIANO MACALUSO and JON DRIVER
  34. Electrophysiological Studies of Multisensory Attention
MARTIN EIMER
  35. Neuroimaging Studies of Cross-Modal Integration for Emotion
JOHN O'DOHERTY, EDMUND T. ROLLS and MORTEN KRINGELBACH
  36. Multisensory Perception of Emotion, Its Time Course, and Its Neural Basis
BEATRICE DE GELDER, JEAN VROOMEN and GILLES POURTOIS
VI. THE MATURATION AND PLASTICITY OF MULTISENSORY PROCESSES
  37. Epigenetic Factors That Align Visual and Auditory Maps in the Ferret Midbrain
ANDREW J. KING, TIMOTHY P. DOUBELL and IRINI SKALIORA
  38. Visual Instruction of the Auditory Space Map in the Midbrain
YORAM GUTFREUND and ERIC I. KNUDSEN
  39. The Development of Multisensory Integration
MARK T. WALLACE
  40. Perceptual Development and the Origins of Multisensory Responsiveness
ROBERT LICKLITER and LORRAINE E. BAHRICK
  41. The Value of Multisensory Redundancy in the Development of Intersensory Perception
DAVID J. LEWKOWICZ and KIMBERLY S. KRAEBEL
VII. CROSS-MODAL PLASTICITY
  42. Rewiring Cortex: Cross-Modal Plasticity and Its Implications for Cortical Development and Function
MRIGANKA SUR
  43. Cross-Modal Consequences of Visual Deprivation in Animals
JOSEF P. RAUSCHECKER
  44. Visual Cortical Involvement in Normal Tactile Perception
K. SATHIAN, S. C. PRATHER and M. ZHANG
  45. Visual Cortex Engagement in Tactile Function in the Presence of Blindness
ESTEBAN A. FRIDMAN, PABLO CELNIK and LEONARDO G. COHEN
  46. Compensatory Plasticity as a Consequence of Sensory Loss
BRIGITTE RÖDER and FRANK RÖSLER
  47. Audiovisual Speech Perception in Deaf Adults and Children Following Cochlear Implantation
TONYA R. BERGESON and DAVID B. PISONI
  48. Neuroimaging Studies of Cross-Modal Plasticity and Language Processing in Deaf People
RUTH CAMPBELL and MAIRÉAD MACSWEENEY
VIII. PERSPECTIVES DERIVED FROM CLINICAL STUDIES
  49. Multisensory Integration: Resolving Ambiguities for Human Postural Control
LESLIE ALLISON and JOHN J. JEKA
  50. Neuropsychological Evidence of Integrated Multisensory Representation of Space in Humans
ELISABETTA LÁDAVAS and ALESSANDRO FARNÉ
  51. Cross-Modal Integration and Spatial Attention in Relation to Tool Use and Mirror Use: Representing and Extending Multisensory Space Near the Hand
ANGELO MARAVITA and JON DRIVER
  52. Grapheme-Color Synesthesia: When 7 Is Yellow and D Is Blue
MIKE J. DIXON, DANIEL SMILEK, BRANDON WAGAR and PHILIP M. MERIKLE
  53. Behavioral and Brain Correlates of Multisensory Experience in Synesthesia
JASON B. MATTINGLEY and ANINA N. RICH
  54. Synesthesia, Cross-Activation, and the Foundations of Neuroepistemology
V. S. RAMACHANDRAN, E. M. HUBBARD and P. A. BUTCHER

 

The Handbook of Multisensory Processes

Overview

This landmark reference work brings together for the first time in one volume the most recent research from different areas of the emerging field of multisensory integration. After many years of using a modality-specific "sense-by-sense" approach, researchers across different disciplines in neuroscience and psychology now recognize that perception is fundamentally a multisensory experience. To understand how the brain synthesizes information from the different senses, we must study not only how information from each sensory modality is decoded but also how this information interacts with the sensory processing taking place within other sensory channels. The findings cited in The Handbook of Multisensory Processes suggest that there are broad underlying principles that govern this interaction, regardless of the specific senses involved.

The book is organized thematically into eight sections; each of the 55 chapters presents a state-of-the-art review of its topic by leading researchers in the field. The key themes addressed include multisensory contributions to perception in humans; whether the sensory integration involved in speech perception is fundamentally different from other kinds of multisensory integration; multisensory processing in the midbrain and cortex in model species, including rat, cat, and monkey; behavioral consequences of multisensory integration; modern neuroimaging techniques, including EEG, PET, and fMRI, now being used to reveal the many sites of multisensory processing in the brain; multisensory processes that require postnatal sensory experience to emerge, with examples from multiple species; brain specialization and possible equivalence of brain regions; and clinical studies of such breakdowns of normal sensory integration as brain damage and synesthesia.