Monthly
208 pp. per issue
8 1/2 x 11, illustrated
ISSN
0898-929X
E-ISSN
1530-8898
2014 Impact factor:
4.69

Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience

March 2000, Vol. 12, No. 2, Pages 233-237
(doi: 10.1162/089892900562011)
© 2000 Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Color Vision and the Four-Color-Map Problem
Article PDF (214.29 KB)
Abstract

Four different colors are needed to make maps that avoid adjacent countries of the same color. Because the retinal image is two dimensional, like a map, four dimensions of chromatic experience would also be needed to optimally distinguish regions returning spectrally different light to the eye. We therefore suggest that the organization of human color vision according to four-color classes (reds, greens, blues, and yellows) has arisen as a solution to this logical requirement in topology.