Monthly
208 pp. per issue
8 1/2 x 11, illustrated
ISSN
0898-929X
E-ISSN
1530-8898
2014 Impact factor:
4.69

Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience

November 1998, Vol. 10, No. 6, Pages 778-782
(doi: 10.1162/089892998563068)
© 1998 Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Interview with Larry R. Squire
Article PDF (61.32 KB)
Abstract

Larry R. Squire is Professor of Psychiatry, Neurosciences, and Psychology at the University of California, San Diego, and Research Career Scientist at the San Diego Veterans Affairs Medical Center. He received a B.A. from Oberlin College, a Ph.D. from MIT, and did postdoctoral work at the Albert Einstein Medical School. His most influential mentors were Hans-Lukas Teuber and Samuel H. Barondes. His work has focused broadly on the problem of how the brain accomplishes learning and memory. Some of this work has involved mice and rats, but most of it has been carried out with monkeys and humans. Although his own studies have been concerned primarily with the function and organization of the brain systems that support memory, he sees the modern science of memory as benefiting from a broad range of approaches that includes the cellular and molecular study of synaptic plasticity as well as the study of normal cognition. In 1993–1994 he served as President of the Society for Neuroscience. He is a member of the National Academy of Sciences, the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and the American Philosophical Society. A book, Memory: From Mind to Molecules, coauthored with Eric Kandel, will be published in late 1998 by W. H. Freeman and Company.