Quarterly (winter, spring, summer, fall)
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7 x 10, illustrated
ISSN
1064-5462
E-ISSN
1530-9185
2014 Impact factor:
1.39

Artificial Life

Winter-Spring 2005, Vol. 11, No. 1-2, Pages 13-29
(doi: 10.1162/1064546053278973)
© 2005 Massachusetts Institute of Technology
The Development of Embodied Cognition: Six Lessons from Babies
Article PDF (1.14 MB)
Abstract

The embodiment hypothesis is the idea that intelligence emerges in the interaction of an agent with an environment and as a result of sensorimotor activity. We offer six lessons for developing embodied intelligent agents suggested by research in developmental psychology. We argue that starting as a baby grounded in a physical, social, and linguistic world is crucial to the development of the flexible and inventive intelligence that characterizes humankind.