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The CogNet Library : References Collection
The Handbook of Multisensory Processes
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June 2004
ISBN 0-262-03321-6
8 1/2 x 11, 950 pp., 334 illus.
$125.00/£80.95 (CLOTH)

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From Bradford Books:
The Handbook of Multisensory Processes
Edited by Gemma A. Calvert, Charles Spence and Barry E. Stein

This landmark reference work brings together for the first time in one volume the most recent research from different areas of the emerging field of multisensory integration. The book is organized thematically into eight sections; each of the 55 chapters presents a state-of-the-art review of its topic by leading researchers in the field. The key themes addressed include multisensory contributions to perception in humans; whether the sensory integration involved in speech perception is fundamentally different from other kinds of multisensory integration; multisensory processing in the midbrain and cortex in model species, including rat, cat, and monkey; behavioral consequences of multisensory integration; modern neuroimaging techniques, including EEG, PET, and fMRI, now being used to reveal the many sites of multisensory processing in the brain; multisensory processes that require postnatal sensory experience to emerge, with examples from multiple species; brain specialization and possible equivalence of brain regions; and clinical studies of such breakdowns of normal sensory integration as brain damage and synesthesia.

Gemma Calvert is a Wellcome Career Development Fellow and Head of the Multisensory Research Group at the Department of Physiology and Center for Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Brain at Oxford University.

Charles Spence is Director of the Crossmodal Research Group at the Department of Experimental Psychology at Oxford University.

Barry E. Stein is Professor and Chair of the Department of Neurobiology and Anatomy at Wake Forest University School of Medicine.

Table of Contents
 Introduction
I.PERCEPTUAL CONSEQUENCES OF MULTIPLE SENSORY SYSTEMS
II.IS SPEECH A SPECIAL CASE OF MULTISENSORY INTEGRATION?
III.THE NEURAL MECHANISMS UNDERLYING THE INTEGRATION OF CROSS-MODAL CUES
IV.MULTISENSORY MECHANISMS IN ORIENTATION
V.HUMAN BRAIN STUDIES OF MULTISENSORY PROCESSES
VI.THE MATURATION AND PLASTICITY OF MULTISENSORY PROCESSES
VII.CROSS-MODAL PLASTICITY
VIII.PERSPECTIVES DERIVED FROM CLINICAL STUDIES


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