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Linguistic Inquiry

Summer 2001, Vol. 32, No. 3, Pages 371-403
(doi: 10.1162/002438901750372504)
© 2001 Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Resumption, Movement, and Derivational Economy
Article PDF (149.11 KB)
Abstract

This article investigates the interaction between resumption and movement. Lebanese Arabic distinguishes between true resumption, where a pronoun or an epithet phrase is related to an Ā-antecedent via Bind, and apparent resumption, where the pronoun or the epithet phrase is related to its Ā-antecedent via Move. Only apparent resumption displays reconstruction effects for scope and binding. As resumptives, strong pronouns and epithet phrases cannot be related to a quantificational antecedent unless they occur inside islands. We account for this Obviation Requirement as follows: (a) (true) resumption is a last resort device, (b) strong pronouns and epithet phrases in apparent resumption contexts are generated as appositive modifiers of a DP, which is fronted to an Ā-position, and (c) appositive modifiers are interpreted as independent clauses. Obviation is reduced to the inability of quantifiers to bind a pronominal element across sentential boundaries.